An Inheritance of Ghosts

Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks and Hester Ann Hess

Posted in Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks, Hester Ann (Hess) Mattocks, Hester Ann Hess by Gregg Mattocks on 22 April 2009

Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks [16]

Father: Ichabod Mattocks [32]

Mother: Malinda Jones [33]

Mattocks Family Heritage entry

Hester Ann Hess [17]

Father: Andrew Hess [34]

Mother: —– —– [35]

Mattocks Family Heritage entry

*

Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks [16] was, I believe, born 17 April 1827 at Bennington, New York, in that part of Genesee County which would later become part of Wyoming County.  All census records give Rumsey’s birthplace as New York State, but the one mention of his nativity made in his Civil War pension record relates that he was instead born at Bennington, Vermont.  Rumsey’s granddaughter Amy Tanner also believed that Rumsey was born at Bennington, Vermont.  But we know that Rumsey’s parents were living at Genesee County, New York, in 1820, and the family was at Bennington Township in New York in 1830, just three years after Rumsey’s birth.  I cannot help but believe that there was some confusion between the New York town and its more famous counterpart in Vermont.  Indeed, if Amy Tanner had access to the pension record, her belief that her grandfather was born in Vermont may well have stemmed from that source.

Rumsey was perhaps named after Doctor Cyrus Rumsey, who practiced from about 1822 to 1828 at Warsaw, Genesee County, and therefore may have been the doctor who was in attendance at Rumsey Mattocks’ birth.  On the other hand, Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks’ first name may instead have been in honor of his uncle Cyrus Jones.

In 1830, Rumsey was almost certainly living with his parents at Bennington Township, Genesee County.  In 1840, Rumsey was living with his parents at Orangeville, Genesee County.

Sometime between 1840 and 1850, the family migrated to Illinois.  Amy Tanner believed that the Mattocks family made the trip in a covered wagon.

1850 Census, Iroquois County, Illinois (click to enlarge)

In September 1850, “Rumsey Mattox,” a farmer, aged 23, was living in his mother’s household in Census District 21, Iroquois County, Illinois.  Rumsey was considered the male head of household, but he owned no real estate and apparently farmed on rented or borrowed land.  I speculate that the land may have belonged to Rumsey’s uncle Edward M. Jones, who is known to have lived close by.

Reuben Dayton claimed to have met Rumsey about 1852.  Dayton claimed that he “[u]sed to live near neighbor to him Mattocks, and frequently work with said Mattocks, at farm work. Saw him on an average as often as once a week.”  According to Dayton, who was about twenty at the time, “Mattocks was a stout healthy young man and could do a good fair days work at any kind of farm labor.”  Cyrus L. Chase, a 21-year-old resident of Momence Township, Kankakee County, Illinois, also became friends with Rumsey about this time.  Chase “[w]orked with Mattocks at breaking prairie and other kinds of work, and during this period lived within about 3 quarters of a mile from said Mattocks.”  Rumsey also made the acquaintance of 27-year-0ld Caleb J. Wells about this time.

Rumsey married first, as her first husband, about 1858, the young Hester Ann Hess [17].  Hester was born about 1844 or 1845 at Morocco, Newton County, Indiana, the daughter of Andrew Hess.  Hester’s mother, whose identity is unknown, probably died between 1846 and 1850.  In 1850, Hester was living with her father and her sister at Jackson Township, Jasper County, Indiana.

Hester may well have been pregnant at the time of her marriage as son Walter was born in August 1858.

 

1860 Census, Kankakee County, Illinois (click to enlarge)

1860 Census, Kankakee County, Illinois (click to enlarge)

In June 1860, Rumsey, a farmer, aged 31, was living with his wife Esther A., aged 16, and Rumsey’s mother Malinda at Momence Township.  At that time, Rumsey’s personal property was valued at $200.  He apparently owned no real estate at this time, and therefore was farming on rented or borrowed land, perhaps on land owned by his uncle John A. Jones.

 

Momence Township, Kankakee County, Illinois, 1883 (click to enlarge)

Momence Township, Kankakee County, Illinois, 1883 (click to enlarge)

By studying the 1860 Census, we can find out who Rumsey’s neighbors were at that time.  The households listed on the same page as the Mattocks household were those of Caleb Wells, Reuben Dayton, Nancy Sanford, Phelix Haines, Phebe Line, Christopher Ainsworth, John A. Jones, [Rumsey Mattocks], and Welden Staunton.  Comparing these names with those in an 1883 land ownership map of Momence Township, we find that most of these neighbors can be found in Section 19 of Township 31-N, Range 15-E, just south of the Kankakee River before it enters Indiana.  John A. Jones was located in Section 30 in 1883, the section just south of Section 19. It would seem a good guess that the Mattocks family was living very nearby in either Section 30 or 19.

The Civil War

By July 1862, things were not going well for the Union cause. Early in July, President Abraham Lincoln issued a call for three hundred thousand volunteers. The quota for Illinois — the president’s home state — would be 26,148.  Initially recruitment went slowly.

In Chicago, for example, the six recruiters averaged fewer than one recruit each week. City men were reluctant to forego high wages for low army pay. In rural areas, married men were unwilling to enlist unless they were assured their families would be cared for while they were gone. In August, Illinoisans faced the additional obstacle of the fall harvest. Unless farmers could be persuaded to enter the army, either from a spirit of patriotism or fear of the draft, the state’s quota would not be met. The threat of a draft now enticed men to arms, however, because of the stigma attached to being conscripted. Despite some hesitancy, by mid-August patriotic fervor had attracted so many to the national colors that the state was unable to provide adequately for the assembled multitudes.

On 14 August 1862, Rumsey, aged about 35, enlisted as a private in Company K of the 113th Regiment of the Illinois Volunteer Infantry.  He was enrolled at Chicago, Illinois, by the company’s captain, Silas J. Garrett, to serve three years or until the end of the war.  Also joining this company was Rumsey’s brother Walter.  Charles, Jacob, and James Hess all served in Company K, and were probably all near relatives of Rumsey’s wife Hester.  At the time of his enlistment, Rumsey was described as being six feet tall, of fair complexion, with blue eyes and dark hair.

The 113th Illinois Infantry was also known as the Third Chicago Board of Trade Regiment. The regiment was organized in Chicago and brought into service on 1 October 1862. Rumsey and Walter were amongst those mustered into service on that day. The 113th trained at Camp Hancock, near Camp Douglas and Chicago. The regiment served under Colonel George B. Hoge of Chicago. The Lieutenant Colonel, John W. Paddock, was from Kankakee County. Of the regiment’s ten companies, three were recruited from Kankakee County. Of the 172 soldiers in Company K whose place of residence is known, 44 were from Momence. Many others came from nearby towns. The regiment did not have a band.

Ultimately, in response to Lincoln’s call for troops, Illinois furnished 58,689 men, in fifty-nine infantry regiments and six artillery batteries. Only New York and Pennsylvania furnished more. The organization of volunteers in Illinois had been entrusted to General John Alexander McClernand as assistant to Governor Richard Yates.

McClernand assumed his new duties with enthusiasm and a well organized plan for fulfilling his responsibilities. As Yates was the commander of the Illinois militia, as well as the senior politician in the state, McClernand informed him of the steps he was taking to organize and muster units. He directed his staff to address the myriad details involved in raising and outfitting large numbers of troops—establishing encampments; organizing the units; procuring ordnance; training artillerymen; providing medical support as well as clothing, blankets, and camp equipment; and, of course, obtaining the blank forms, stationery, and instruction books so essential to modern warfare. He recommended that troops be concentrated at no more than four locations, in order to maximize efficiency. He asked about barracks, transportation, and weapons….

McClernand recognized the necessity for adequate training. His aide at Camp Duncan, Illinois, reported that he had established a training schedule for the 101st Illinois Regiment consisting of early-morning instruction for officers followed by squad and company drill. Officer instruction was held again after lunch, followed by battalion drill and a dress parade….

… McClernand showed remarkable organizational talents and an understanding of the myriad details involved in such undertakings. He asked for numbers of soldiers, about weapons available and sources for those required, about deficiencies, whether money was available for disbursing bounties and advance pay for soldiers departing, about uniform requirements, and for the names of officers in charge of the mustering sites. Those regiments reported as ready to move he ordered to do so immediately. On 29 October he was spurred to even greater zeal by two telegrams from Stanton that requested that he “get the troops forward as fast as possible…. The importance of the expedition on the Mississippi is every day becoming more manifest.”

Memphis, Tennessee

On 6 November 1862, the 113th was ordered to report to Major-General William Tecumseh Sherman at Memphis, Tennessee. Sherman had arrived at Memphis on 21 July 1862, and “found the place dead.” Most of the population was in sympathy with the South, but Sherman was determined to make Memphis a safe place for his troops, and to revive it from its depressed state. With steamboats traveling down the Mississippi from the North, full of passengers and freight, Memphis was soon bustling once again. Sherman busied himself strengthening fortifications and administering the city. His duties included curbing smuggling across the River, dealing with drunken and unruly soldiers after pay-day, enforcing laws against pillaging, pursuing rebel guerillas operating in the vicinity, and publicly condemning those who spoke of his soldiers as “Northern barbarians” and “Lincoln’s hirelings.”

Arriving at Memphis in November, the 113th Infantry was attached to the First Brigade, District of Memphis, Right Wing Thirteenth Army Corps (Old), Department of the Tennessee. This Brigade was commanded by Brigadier-General Morgan L. Smith. Sherman shortly thereafter re-organized his divisions, and the 113th was attached to the First Brigade, Second Division, District of Memphis, Thirteenth Army Corps.

Most of Sherman’s troops were kept in camps “back of the city.” Battalion and brigade drills were strictly enforced, so that Sherman’s 18,252 men were “in the best possible order” as “the season approached for active operations farther south.”

Sherman went to Columbus, Kentucky, to confer with Major-General Ulysses S. Grant.  Grant, as part of his ultimate object of capturing Vicksburg, Mississippi, and opening up the Mississippi River to navigation, “proposed to move against [General John C.] Pemberton, then intrenched on a line behind the Tallahatchie River below Holly Springs, [Mississippi].”  It was Grant’s plan to “move on Holly Springs and Abberville [Abbeville, Mississippi], from Grand Junction, [Tennessee]; that [General James B.] McPherson, with the troops at Corinth, [Mississippi], would aim to make junction with him at Holly Springs.” Sherman was to leave a garrison behind at Memphis and, with his remaining troops, advance on the Tallahatchie, so as to come up on Grant’s right. On 24 November 1862, Sherman marched out of Memphis with three divisions, among which was the 113th Illinois Regiment.

The divisions took different roads in a south-south-easterly direction, traveling about forty miles until they approached the Tallahatchie. The divisions converged at Wyatte, Mississippi, on 2 December 1862, “to cross the river, there a bold, deep stream, with a newly-constructed fort behind.” They had met no opposition on their march. It was learned that Pemberton’s army had fallen back for safety to the Yalabusha River, near Grenada, Mississippi.

It was during this expedition, in late November or early December, that Rumsey Mattocks contracted “camp diarrhea” caused “by exposure and drinking bad water.” Rumsey continued to suffer from diarrhea as long as he remained with the regiment and off and on for many years thereafter.

At Wyatte, the troops had to build a bridge, “which consumed a couple of days,” but by 5 December, Sherman’s entire command was at College Hill, ten miles from Oxford, Mississippi. Sherman met with Grant at Oxford to discuss options now that Pemberton had removed to Grenada. It was decided that the time was right for a move on Vicksburg.

After the fall of Memphis and New Orleans in 1862, Vicksburg was the principal remaining Confederate strongpoint on the Mississippi River. The city was perched on steep bluffs overlooking a sharp bend in the river. As long as the city remained in Confederate hands, trade from the Great Plains and the Ohio Valley down the Mississippi River was cut off. In addition, the possession of the city kept open the flow of supplies from the trans-mississippi region of Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. The loss of the city would cut the Confederacy in two.

The first attempt on the city was made by the Navy. Ironclad gunboats from Memphis joined the downriver gunboats from New Orleans in a rather ineffective bombardment of the city. Unable to force the surrender of the city, both squadrons returned to their starting points with little to show for their efforts. It became clear that the Navy alone could not capture Vicksburg. 

The pressure on Sherman and Grant to capture Vicksburg and open up the Mississippi was tremendous. Their mission, they knew, was risky and perhaps ill-timed, but they felt they had to act. It is even possible that Grant may have determined to make the move on Vicksburg in order to beat General McClernand to the punch. McClernand, an ambitious political officer and former law-partner of Abraham Lincoln, was determined to make a name for himself in the war, and was jealous of the success of both Sherman and Grant.

[McClernand] had secretly proposed an expedition against Vicksburg to “show what a volunteer officer could do.” Grant and General-in-Chief [Henry W.] Halleck back in Washington were not informed of McClearnand’s [sic] orders or intentions, although his troops began arriving in Memphis. Grant had been planning an overland push towards Vicksburg and was concerned that his effort would draw all the Confederate defenders to his front, giving McClernand an easy job in taking Vicksburg. Determined to avoid all the work with none of the glory, Grant basically hijacked McClernand[’]s troops in Memphis (with Halleck[’]s approval) and began a two-pronged effort to capture the city.

Sherman’s instructions were to return with a division to Memphis to take command of all troops gathered there, then embark down the Mississippi to the Yazoo River with a force of thirty thousand men, and from the Yazoo, capture the small garrison at Vicksburg from the rear. Naval gunboats had already secured the Yazoo up for 23 miles to a fort at Haine’s Bluff. Grant wrote that Sherman was to land above Vicksburg, “cut the Mississippi Central road and the road running east from Vicksburg, where they cross the Black River.” From there, Sherman was to use his own judgment “to secure the end desired.” In the meantime, Grant would engage Pemberton’s troops, pursue them if they retreated south toward Vicksburg, and attempt to join up with Sherman on the Yazoo.

Sherman selected the division of Brigadier-General Morgan L. Smith to return with him to Memphis. So it was, on 8 December 1862, that the Illinois 113th Regiment was part of the command that departed with Sherman from Oxford, traveling “by the most direct route.” Morgan L. Smith’s Second Division, comprising 7,000 men in ten regiments, reached Memphis on the morning of 13 December 1862.  On that day Sherman issued orders that made it clear that the campaign against Vicksburg was about to begin.  Divisdion commanders were warned to have their commands ready for active service, givingclose and assiduous attention to all the details necessary to make them efficient by land or water” and having “all things ready to embark by water or take the field by or before the 18th.”  Sherman assigned embarkation points for his three divisions, assigning “the Second Division the levee from the packet landing to the mouth of Wolf River.”  Commanders and quartermasters were to “familiarize themselves with these localities and routes leading to them, being careful not to cross the route of any other division, and they may select and have the exclusive use of some one or more buildings and warehouses contiguous, in which to assemble their material of war not in the hands of the men.”  And finally, Sherman ordered that:

Each soldier must carry his musket, 60 rounds of ammunition, knapsack, haversack, and canteen, and nothing else; officers, their side-arms and a small trunk or valise, carefully marked; companies, not to exceed tents per company and one for the officers, with five days’ rations and cooking utensils, compact and handy; regiments, one ambulance, four good six mule or horse wagons, and one wagon loaded with extra cartridges; brigades, a small special train to carry ammunition to complete a quantity of 200 cartridges per man, inclusive of those in cartridge-boxes and regimental wagons; and divisions, a small train to repair losses, tools for all sorts of repairs, building bridges, repairing roads, and making redoubts, obstructions, and rifle-pits.

The Vicksburg Campaign

Sherman acted with great haste, knowing that surprise was the essence of the whole plan. He once again re-organized his command, but Morgan L. Smith’s division kept it’s designation as the First Brigade, Second Division. A large fleet of steamboats from St. Louis and Cairo was assembled on the River to transport the troops. Admiral David Dixon Porter also arrived with his entire gunboat fleet.  These transports and the brigades they were to carry were given strict orders governing their advance on Vicksburg.

Captains, pilots, and engineers of transports must hold their boats to their places in column, must not fall behind or push ahead, keeping on the quarter, following their brigade leader. Each brigade will keep together and each division in one group, whether on the river or lying to the shore. Boats will not land singly on any account, but will, if need be, get wood or coal of some consort. If necessary to get wood the division commander will give the necessary orders. In case of grounding, striking a snag, or accident that disables a boat, she will make the alarm-signal, and the nearest boats will go to the relief and the nearest brigade commander give the necessary orders. Boats carrying a division commander will carry the United States flag at the fore-jack staff and another at the stern. Brigade commanders will carry the United States flag on the fore-jack staff and a regimental color near the pilot-house. All other boats will simply carry their regimental colors near the pilot-house, without any other signal. In making landings for rendezvous, or for the night, or to lay by, divisions will keep well apart, occupying opposite shores, but near enough to hear a gun or boat-whistle; if lying to, a signal gun from the head of column will be the signal to make steam and for a start. Each division will move in succession, in this order, first, second, third, and fourth, unless one or other is detailed by special orders, of which notice will previously be given. In case a boat is fired into from the shore by rifles or musketry the nearest boat will at once make a landing and clear out all opposition. If fired on by cannon the nearest brigade will effect a landing and attack, sending prompt notice to the division commander and he to the general in command of the whole. In case of any attack the property or stores useful to the United States will be taken possession of and the neighboring houses, barns, &c., burned. First rendezvous is Helena; the second, Gaines’ Landing[, Arkansas]; last, Milliken’s Bend[, Louisiana]. On arrival of each, full morning and other reports will be made of regiments, brigades, and divisions. At the last rendezvous division commanders, after disposing of their commands at the shore, will report in person to the general-in-chief, on board the flag-boat Forest Queen. All officers in command are charged specially with the police and cleanliness of their boats, and good condition of arms, cartridges, and accouterments. All facilities must be adopted for cooking, and the commanders must see in person that their men and officers have all the conveniences of their boats. All firing of guns, pistols, yelling or hallooing, or improper noises must be prevented. These are all false signals and mislead the commanders. 

Further orders made it clear that the expedition was of a purely military character.

No citizen, male or female, will be allowed to accompany it, unless employed as part of a crew, or as a servant to the transports; female chambermaids to boats and nurses to sick alone will be allowed, unless the wives of captains or pilots actually belonging to boats. No laundress, officers’ or soldiers’ wives must pass below Helena.

… No persons whatever, citizens, officers, or sutlers, will, on any consideration, buy or deal in cotton or other produce of the country. Should any cotton be brought on board of a transport, going or returning, the brigade quartermaster of which the boat forms a part will take possession of it and invoice it to Capt. A.R. Eddy, chief quartermaster at Memphis, Tenn….

 The Memphis troops, numbering 20,523, were embarked on 19 December.  Rumsey’s 113th Regiment was on board the steamer Edward Walsh. Morgan L. Smith’s division numbered 5,582 in ten regiments making up two brigades. This division arrived at Friar’s Point, Mississippi, by the morning of the 21st. There, on the 22nd, the division of Brigadier-General Frederick Steele joined them with about 12,510 men, bringing the aggregate force to 33,033. The troops were divided among at least 59 transports. On the following day, Sherman issued detailed orders and maps to his division commanders.

In the present instance our object is to secure the navigation of the Mississippi River and its main branches, and to hold them as military channels of communication and for commercial purposes. The river above Vicksburg has been gained by conquering the country to its rear, of great value to us; but the enemy still holds the river from Vicksburg to Baton Rouge, navigating it with its boats, and the possession of it enables him to connect his communications and routes of supply east and west.

To deprive him of this will be a severe blow, and if done effectually of great value to us and probably the most decisive act of this war. To accomplish this important result we are to act our part, an important one, of the great whole.

General [Nathaniel] Banks with a large force has re-enforced General [Benjamin F.] Butler in Louisiana, and from that quarter an expedition by water and land is coming northward. General Grant, with the Thirteenth Army Corps, of which we compose the right wing, is moving southward. The naval squadron, Admiral Porter, is operating with his fleet by water, each in perfect harmony with the other.

General Grant’s left and center were at last accounts approaching the Yalabusha (near Grenada), and the railroad to his rear, by which he drew his supplies, was reported to be seriously damaged. This may disconcert him somewhat, but only makes more important our line of operations.

At the Yalabusha General Grant may encounter the army of General Pemberton, the same which refused him battle on the line of the Tallahatchie, which was strongly fortified; but as he will not have time to fortify the Yalabusha he will hardly stand there, and in that event General Grant will immediately advance down the high ridge lying between the Big Black and Yazoo, and will expect to meet us on the Yazoo and receive from us the supplies which he needs and which he knows we carry along. Parts of this general plan are to co-operate with the naval squadron in the reduction of Vicksburg, to secure possession of the land lying between the Yazoo and the Black, and to act in concert with General Grant against Pemberton’s forces, supposed to have Jackson, Miss., as a point of concentration.

Vicksburg is doubtless very strongly fortified both against the river and land approaches. Already the gunboats have secured the Yazoo up for 23 miles to a fort on the Yazoo at Haines’ Bluff, giving us a choice for a landing place at some point up the Yazoo below this fort, or on the island which lies between Vicksburg and present mouth of the Yazoo….

But before any actual collision with the enemy I purpose, after assembling our whole land force at Gaines’ Landing, Ark., to proceed in order to Milliken’s Bend … and there dispatch a brigade without wagons or any incumbrances whatever to the Vicksburg and Shreveport Railroad … to destroy that effectually and cut off that fruitful avenue of supply; then to proceed to the mouth of the Yazoo, and after possessing ourselves of the latest and most authentic information from naval officers now there, to land our whole force on the Mississippi side and then reach the point where the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad crosses the Big Black …, after which to attack Vicksburg by land while the gunboats assail it by water.

It may be necessary (looking to Grant’s approach) before attacking Vicksburg to reduce the battery at Haines’ Bluff first, so as to enable some of the lighter gunboats and transports to ascend the Yazoo and communicate with General Grant.

The detailed manner of accomplishing these results will be communicated in due season, and these general points are only made known at this time that commanders may study the maps, and also that, in the event of non-receipt of orders, all may act in perfect concert by following the general movement, unless specially detached.

You all now have the same map, so that no mistakes or confusion need result from different names of localities. All possible preparations as to wagons, provisions, axes, and intrenching tools should be made in advance, so that when we do land there will be no want of them. When we begin to act on the shore we must do the work quickly and effectually.

The gunboats under Admiral Porter will do their full share, and I feel assured that the army will not fall short in its work. Division commanders may read this to regimental commanders and furnish brigade commanders a copy. They should also cause as many copies of the map to be made on the same scale as possible, being very careful in copying the names.

At Grenada, Lieutenant-General John C. Pemberton, commanding the Confederate troops in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, became aware on 21 December that the enemy had a “large fleet of gunboats and transports was moving down the Mississippi River for the supposed purpose of attacking Vicksburg.”  Pemberton ordered Brigadier General [J.C.] Vaughn’s brigade was at once ordered forward.  By the 24th, it became clear to the Southern forces “that the enemy’s gunboats had arrived at the mouth of the Yazoo River, 6 miles above Vicksburg, and that his transports were not far in their rear.”  Brigadier General [John] Gregg with his brigade was sent to meet Sherman’s advancing forces.

Sherman’s next stop was Gaines’ Landing, Arkansas. The general described succeeding events with great clarity:

The Mississippi boats were admirably calculated for handling troops, horses, guns, stores, etc., easy of embarkation and disembarkation, and supplies of all kinds were abundant, except fuel. For this we had to rely on wood, but most of the wood-yards, so common on the river before the war, had been exhausted, so that we had to use fence-rails, old dead timber, the logs of houses, etc. Having abundance of men and plenty of axes, each boat could daily procure a supply.

In proceeding down the river, one or more of Admiral Porter’s gunboats took the lead; others were distributed throughout the column, and some brought up the rear. We manœuvred by divisions and brigades when in motion, and it was a magnificent sight as we thus steamed down the river. What few inhabitants remained at the plantations on the river-bank were unfriendly, except the slaves; some few guerilla-parties infested the banks, but did not dare molest so strong a force as I then commanded.

We reached Milliken’s Bend on Christmas-day, when I detached one brigade ([Stephen G.] Burbridge’s), of [Brigadier-General] A[ndrew] J. Smith’s division, to the southwest, to break up the railroad leading from Vicksburg toward Shreveport, Louisiana. Leaving A.J. Smith’s division there to await the return of Burbridge, the remaining three divisions proceeded, on the 26th, to the mouth of the Yazoo.

 [Report of Brigadier-General Andrew J. Smith, U.S. Army.]

On the morning of the 22d ultimo we continued down the river and arrived at Milliken’s Bend on the night of the 24th.

[Maj. Gen. Matin L. Smith, C.S. Army:]

Certain information regarding the proximity of the enemy’s fleet was first received on the morning of December 23, and by 10 o’clock that night seventy-four transports were known to be in the vicinity of the mouth of the Yazoo, together with some twelve gunboats that had previously arrived. This number was increased during the succeeding two or three days to about one hundred and twenty.

On the west bank of the Mississippi, opposite the Yazoo, Sherman dispatched a brigade under General Morgan L. Smith, to destroy another section of the railroad from Vicksburg to Shreveport, which was “accomplished fully, so that the Vicksburg and Shreveport Railroad, by which vast amounts of supplies reach Vicksburg, is, and must remain for months, useless to our enemy.”

Arkansas Post 

Battle of Arkansas Post

Battle of Arkansas Post

According to Rumsey and others, while in the line of battle at Arkansas Post, Arkansas, about one o’clock in the afternoon on 11 January 1863, Rumsey was shot in the leg.  John Sherwood stated that Rumsey “was in the act of loading his gun during the battle when he was struck by a minnie ball in the left leg Just below the knee.”  According to Rumsey, “after striking him [the ball] droped down inside of his close & he picked it up & brought it home with him.” Reportedly Rumsey’s “liver & lungs began troubling him at the same time.”

Soldier Amos Merrill recalled that — when he joined the regiment at Memphis, Tennessee — Rumsey was suffering from diarrhea, and that “on the trip down the Mississippi River on the Vicksburgh Expedition and at Arkansas Post Ark. said Mattocks had the Diarrhoea.”  Merrill reported that Rumsey continued to suffer from this affliction “until he was taken off of the boat near St Louis, Mo. to be placed, as it was reported, in a Hospital.”

Fellow soldier Charles Hess — who had been a neighbor of Rumsey’s before the war — confirmed that “Mattocks had said Diarrhoea on board of the Steamer[?], while guarding prisoners, enroute from Arkansas Post to Springfield Illinois, that when the boat arrived at St Louis Mo said Mattocks was taken off of the boat, and it was reported he was taken to Hospital.”

St. Louis, Missouri, 1860

St. Louis, Missouri, 1860

Toward the end of January or in early February 1863, Rumsey entered the hospital — known as the New House of Refuge — at St. Louis, Missouri, to be treated for chronic diarrhea.  On 11 April 1863, Rumsey was examined by Dr. A Hammer, who made the following finding:

I CERTIFY that I have examined the said Rumsey Mattocks of Captain Garretts Company, and find him incapable of performing the duties of a soldier be cause of Chronic Diarrhoea and infiltration in superior lobe of right lung. Also enlargement of spleen and liver. Great emaciation and debility. Off duty about 3 months.

Nursing the sick during the Civil War

Nursing the sick during the Civil War

Rumsey remained at the hospital until he was discharged from the service, according to Rumsey “on or about July 1863.” Official records indicate that Rumsey was discharged on 14 April 1863 by Col. Henry Almstedt, commander of Rumsey’s regiment.  Discharge papers indicated that Rumsey “was born in Bennington in the State of Vermont, is 28 years of age, 6 feet — inches high, Fair complexion, Blue eyes, Dark hair, and by occupation when enlisted a Farmer. During the last two months said soldier has been unfit for duty 60 days.”

Rumsey’s friend Reuben Dayton saw the soldier “immediately after he was discharged from the Military service in the fall or latter part of the summer of 1863.”  Reuben noted that Rumsey “was suffering from Chronic diarrhea, was very much reduced, and was unable to do any work or even leave his room or bed.”

Cyrus B. Scott became acquainted with Rumsey shortly after his discharge “in the latter part of the summer of 1863” near Lake Village, Indiana.  The two would remain friends for many years thereafter.  Scott declared that, “at the time of his first acquaintance … Mattocks looked to be in very poor health, hardly able to walk looked pale ematiated and sickly.”  About a month after their first meeting, Rumsey went to Scott’s “father’s home, and at that time Mattocks complained of having diarrhea.”

Caleb J. Wells, who had known Rumsey since at least 1856, saw the veteran “a week or two after his discharge from the service.”  Rumsey “was in poor health at that time, not hardly able to get around, unable to do any work.”

In the following years, both Scott and Wells “lived neighbors to [Rumsey] off and on, a good part of this period near neighbors, and have seen him often, and know that he has Always had poor health since his discharge, always complained of Army disease (Chronic Diarrhea) and [Scott and Wells] both say that it is their opinion that said Mattocks since the date of his discharge has not been able to perform no more than one fourth of an ordinary able bodied mans labor, owing as [they] believe, to the existanse of his army disease.”

Divorce

Rumsey and Hester’s son William was born in August 1863 in Indiana.  Rumsey and Hester divorced by about August 1870, presumably in that year, at Newton County.

 

1870 Census, Newton County, Indiana (click to enlarge)

1870 Census, Newton County, Indiana (click to enlarge)

In August 1870, Hester A. Mattocks, keeping house and aged 25, was living with her son William, at Lake Township, Newton County.  Living next door were Rumsey’s uncle and aunt, Edward and Catherine Jones.

Hester married second, between 1870 and 1873, Lucian Jones.  Lucian was born in June sometime between 1840 and 1842 in Indiana, the son of John A. and Mary (——) Jones.  It might be of interest to note that Lucian was also the nephew of Hester’s neighbors in 1870, Edward and Catherine Jones.

One wonders what kind of strain Hester’s divorce and re-marriage may have put on family members.  Lucian’s parents were, after all, Rumsey’s uncle and aunt.  In June 1860, Lucian, aged 19, was living with his parents at Momence.  At this time, Lucian was living right next door to the household of Rumsey and Hester Mattocks.

Certainly the situation after Hester’s re-marriage must have been awkward.  And yet Rumsey long remained friends with Charles Hess, who I believe to have been Hester’s cousin.  Rumsey also was a good friend of Cyrus B. Scott who one day, many years later, would marry Lucian and Hester’s daughter Cora Jones.

In June 1870, Lucien, a farmer, aged 27, was living with his brother Ralph at Momence.  Lucien’s parents lived next door.  The census of 1870 recorded that Lucian owned $200 in personal property.

According to Amy Tanner, Hester died when her son William was about 5 or 6 years old, that is about 1868 or 1869.  But census records show that Hester was alive in 1870, and Lucian and Hester had a daughter, Cora Ellen, born about 1873.  Perhaps Hester died in childbirth or shortly thereafter.  Young William ended up living in various households as he grew up, and occasionally with his father Rumsey.  Little Cora was living with her Jones grandparents in 1880.

Lucian, of Momence, married second, as her second husband, 19 July 1877, Ellen [or Ella] J. (——) Scrambling, of Aroma, Kankakee County.  Ellen was born in March 1843 in Ohio.  Ellen had married first, by about 1859, Mr. Scrambling, who was born in Canada.  By her first husband, Ellen had children William S. and Anna Scrambling.

In 1880, Lucien, a farmer, aged 38, was living with his wife Ella, aged 37, and two of Ella’s children by her first husband, at Watseka, Iroquois County.

In June 1900, a Lucian B. Jones, a day laborer, aged 59, was living with his wife Ellen J., aged 57, and Lucian’s widowed father on Allen Street in Farmer City, Santa Anna Township, DeWitt County, Illinois.  The census of 1900 reported that Ellen had given birth to three children, two of whom were living.

In January 1920, a Lucien Jones, widowed, aged 78, and not working, was living alone on Chestnut Street in Momence, Momence Township, Kankakee County.  According to this census record, which I take to be in error, Lucian’s parents were born in Ohio.  Also, this Lucien was listed as a grandfather, though our Lucian apparently had no children of his own.

Rumsey is said to have presented each of his sons with a milk cow at the times of their marriages.

 

1870 Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, part 1 (click to enlarge)

1870 Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, part 1 (click to enlarge)

 

1870 Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, part 2 (click to enlarge)

1870 Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, part 2 (click to enlarge)

In June 1870, “Rumsey Madosc,” a laborer, aged 42, was living in the household of his sister Josephine Martin at Ganeer Township, Kankakee County, Illinois.  Also in the household was John Headen, a farmer, aged 43.  It might very well have been that the property actually belonged to John Headen, as he was the only member of the household who owned real estate.  Though Josephine’s husband John Martin was also listed in the household, I think it possible he may no longer have been living with his wife by this time, for the 1870 Census also records John Martin living with his parents at Jasper County, Indiana.  John and Josephine Martin divorced soon after the Census was taken.

Rumsey married second, 13 November 1871, at Kankakee County, Wealthy Priscilla Perry.  Wealthy was born 17 August 1843 at Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan, the daughter of John Hutchinson and Abigail (Tower) Perry.  In September 1850, Wealthy P., aged 7, was attending school and living with her mother Abigail Perry in Census District 21 of Iroquois County.  In June 1860, Pricilla, aged 16, was living with her mother at Aroma.  In July 1870, Wealthy P., aged 26, was still living with her mother at Aroma.

Rumsey and Wealthy’s daughter Abigail was born in February 1873 at Aroma.  Wealthy, aged 36 years, 1 month, and 28 days, died 15 October 1873, possibly at Aroma.  She was buried at Leggtown Cemetery at Sun River Terrace in Kankakee County.  Wealthy’s young daughter was adopted by Wealthy’s sister Phianna and Phianna’s husband Charles Boswell.

Gravestone of Wealthy Priscilla (Perry) Mattocks

Gravestone of Wealthy Priscilla (Perry) Mattocks

 

War Pension

From 1876 to 1878, Rumsey worked for his friend Cyrus B. Scott with Rumsey reportedly still suffering from the chronic diarrhea he had contracted during the War.  On 6 July 1877, Rumsey, a resident of Lake Village,  Newton County, Indiana, made his initial application for an invalid pension for his Civil War service:

(1) I claim a pension on a wound in my left leg, caused from a gunshot wound while in the service, and it disables me very much, and it is with great difficulty that I am able to travel around at all.

(2) Was treated in the hospital at St. Louis Mo.” and there discharged.

and has not been in the military, naval, marine or civil service of the United States since the _____ day of July 1863.

Since leaving the service he has resided ________ in the County of Kankakee & Newton in the State of Ills” & Ind. and his occupation has
been farming.

Rumsey’s application was witnessed by Enos J. Cotton of Lake Village and James T. Dickey of Kentland, Newton County, both of whom claimed to have known Rumsey for the past fifteen years.

On 29 April 1878, Rumsey’s friend Charles Hess, of Momence, made the following declaration:

I, Charles Hess late a Corperal, of the 113th Regiment of Ills. Vols certify on honor that Cyrus R. Mattocks was a private Co K in my regiment, and is, as I am informed, an applicant for an Invalid Pension; that on or about the 11th day of January 1863 at or near a place called Arkansas Post in the State of Arkansas the said Cyrus R. Mattocks while in the line and discharge of his duty as a soldier, received a gun shot wound in the left leg, under the following circumstances.

At Arkansas Post Battle while fighting in line of Battle in the afternoon about one Oclock. The Ball struck my his leg just below the left Knee while I He was loading my his gun.

It is interesting to note that, in the above affidavit, the last sentence seems to have initially been quoting Rumsey himself and written in the first person singular.  “My” has been changed to “his” and “I” to “He” to reflect the fact that this was instead the declaration of Charles Hess.  We are rather led to believe that Rumsey must have been present when this declaration was made, and that he may well have “coached” Charles in his statement.  Is this a clue that maybe all was not aboveboard in this pension claim?  I will let the reader judge.

On 11 June 1878, John H. Sherwood of Momence made a similar affidavit:

I, John H. Sherwood late a private, of the 113 Regiment of Ills. Vols certify on honor that Cyrus L. Mattocks was a private in Co K in my regiment, and is, as I am informed, an applicant for an Invalid Pension; that on or about the 11th day of January 1863 at or near a place called Arkansas Post in the State of Arkansas the said Cyrus L. Mattocks while in the line and discharge of his duty as a soldier, received a gun shot wound in his left leg. He was in the act of loading his gun during the battle when he was struck by a minnie ball in the left leg Just below the knee.

On 25 June 1878, Rumsey, a resident of Lake Village, swore to the following:

He [Rumsey] is unable to furnish the affidavit of a commissioned officer of his Company or Regiment as to time and place and circumstace of his receiving his wound at the Battle of Arkansas Post (said wound being the ground upon which he bases his application for pension, from the following reasons to wit: One of said officers having moved to Colorado, and the other to the State of Iowa. and this affiant has made dilligent search and inquiry but is unable to acertain the where abouts of either of said Commissioned Offices, and this Affiant further states that he knows of no other officer or officers by whom he can make such proof.

The Adjutant General’s report on Rumsey’s case could find no “record of Wound alleged.”  At the same time, the Pension Office was confirming the military service of Charles Hess and John H. Sherwood, to prove that they were indeed present at Arkansas Post when the alleged gunshot wound occurred.

On 19 March 1879, Surgeon Milton L. Mumsfort made an examination of Rumsey at Morocco, Newton County, Indiana.  Mumsfort made the following observations:

Height, 6 ft.; weight, 150; complexion, Dark; age, 45; pulse, 100; respiration, 24 per min[?]

I find that the above named Cyrus R Mattocks has a small protuberance on the anterior portion of the Fibial bone of the left Leg about line of the uper third it is only a slightly elevated say half an inch in diameter of which is about 3/4 of an inch a small scar no signs of any ball having passed through or in the leg = He in forms me that it was a spent ball and after striking him it it droped down inside of his close & he picked it up & brought it home with him he also informs me he cannot walk on his leg long at a time as it produces pain = his habits are good general health fair weight two and 6/72 of apound to the inch I woud further state he is entitled to half [Lotte?] ($400) per month.

 

1880 Census, Jefferson County, Kansas (click to enlarge)

1880 Census, Jefferson County, Kansas (click to enlarge)

After this, Rumsey traveled to Nortonville, Jefferson County, Kansas, where, as will be seen, in June 1880, he was residing with in the household of his brother Edwin Mattocks.  Also in Nortonville about this time were Rumsey’s brother Walter and his sister Josephine.  According to the 1880 Census, living in Edwin Mattocks’ household in 1880 was a man described as his “brother,” but bearing the name of Ramsey Ross.  The difference in surnames might at first lead one to believe that Ramsey was actually Edwin’s stepbrother or brother-in-law.  In view of known facts, it seems almost impossible that Ramsey was Edwin’s stepbrother.  It also seems unlikely that Ramsey was Florilla’s brother.  First, Florilla had apparently married, as her first husband, a man with the surname Ross, and had a daughter Annie by him.  While certainly not impossible, it stretches credibility to believe that Florilla married a man with the same last name as her maiden name, which would have been the case if Ramsey Ross were Florilla’s brother.  It is just possible, but unlikely, that Annie was an illegitimate daughter who took on her mother’s maiden name, in which case Ramsey and Florilla might indeed be brother and sister.  But several other facts would need to be explained away as well.  In this scenario, Ramsey and Florilla would not merely have to be siblings, but twin siblings, for they are both recorded in the census as being 52 years of age.

 

Nortonville, Jefferson County, Kansas

Nortonville, Jefferson County, Kansas

A simpler explanation presents itself.  The data in the census for Ramsey Ross corresponds very well with what is known of Edwin’s full brother, Rumsey Mattocks.  First and most obvious is the given name itself.  Rumsey’s name, when written, would be easy for a transcriber to mistake for Ramsey, and may even have even mistakenly been recorded as Ramsey by the census taker.  Ramsey was listed in the census as a widower.  Rumsey’s second wife Wealthie died in 1873 and Rumsey did not remarry.  Ramsey’s age in 1880, given as 52 years, corresponds with the age of Rumsey as given in the 1870 census, 42 years.  Ramsey’s birthplace, and the birthplace of his parents, are identical with those of Rumsey.  That Ramsey was unemployed harmonizes with the information found in Rumsey Mattocks’ pension file.  After diligent search, I have been unable to locate any other individual in the 1880 census who might be Rumsey Mattocks.  On the basis of this analysis, the error in the above census record transcription seems to be in assigning the last name Ross to Ramsey/Rumsey.  This man was instead Rumsey Mattocks.

It does not appear that Rumsey remained long in Kansas.  On 5 August 1882, three friends of Rumsey made affidavits on his behalf.  First, Charles Hess, of Momence, made the following declaration:

In the matter of the claim for Invalid Pension of Cyrus R. Mattocks late a private Co. “K” 113th Regiment Ills Vol Infty Personally came before me, a Notary Public in and for the County and State, aforesaid, Charles Hess, aged 37 Years, a resident of Momence Kankakee County State of Illinois ever since his birth a person of lawful age, who, being duly sworn, declares in relation to the aforesaid claim, as follows:

That he (Hess) was late a member of Co. “K” 113 th Regiment Ills Vol Infty in the war of the late Rebellion, that he is well acquainted with said Mattocks, who was a private of said Co “K” and Regiment aforesaid. That affiant Knows of his own personal Knowledge that said Mattocks on or about the last of November or first of December 1862, while on the “Tallahatchie Expedition” in the State of Miss. contracted diarrhea caused by exposure and drinking bad water. That said Mattocks was troubled with said disease so long as he (Mattocks) remained with the Regiment. That said Mattocks was sick with said diarrhea when he left the Regiment January 1863. Affiant further states that he has been intimately acquainted with said Mattocks ever since July 1865, and has worked on adjoining farm to said Mattocks two years. That he has seen said Mattocks frequently, probably on an average as often as once in two weeks since 1865. That during this whole period, Mattocks has had poor health, always complained of diarrhea. And affiant states that he knows that said Mattocks since 1865, has not been able to do no more than one half of an ordinary mans labor, owing as affiant believes to his said disability of Chronic diarrhea. That affiant knows these facts from being with said Mattocks & working with him, and talking with said Mattocks, and observing his actions and general appearance

On the same date, Cyrus L. Chase of Momence made a similar affidavit:

In the matter of the claim for Invalid Pension of Cyrus R. Mattocks late private Co. “K” 113th Regiment Ills Vol. Infty Personally came before me, a Notary Public in and for the County and State, aforesaid, Cyrus L. Chase aged 46, a resident of the Township of Momence in the County of Kankakee & State of Illinois for the past 26 years, a person of lawful age, who, being duly sworn, declares in relation to the aforesaid claim, as follows:

That he has been acquainted with said Mattocks for the past 25 years, Knew him intimately befor said Mattocks enlisted in 1862. That for five years before said soldier enlisted, affiant saw said Mattocks frequently. Worked with Mattocks at breaking prairie and other kinds of work, and during this period lived within about 3 quarters of a mile from said Mattocks, and affiant states of his own personal Knowledge that before he enlisted, said Mattocks was a stout healthy young man, could do a fair days work at any kind of farm labor. Never was during that period, sick to affiants Knowledge. Affiant further states that he saw said soldier immediately after his dis charge from the Military service in 1863. That said soldier came home sick with what was called Chronic diarrhea, and was bad sick, was for a long time confined to his bed, & was treated by a physician and had to be waited upon constanly, Affiant states further that he has lived within 3 miles of said soldier ever since his discharge and has seen him as often as once in each week, and affiant states that said soldier has been continualy afflicted with said disease, not constanty, but at frequent periods, and affiant has seen said soldier labor many times, and knows that said Mattocks cannot perform no where near a full days work, but can do not more than one half of an ordinary Mans work, owing to the effect, as affiant believes, of said diarrhea.

On the same day, Reuben Dayton of Momence added his statement to the evidence:

In the matter of the claim for Cyrus R. Mattocks, for an invalid Pension, late private of Co. “K” 113th Regiment Illinois Vol Infty Personally came before me, a Notary Public in and for the County and State, aforesaid, Reuben Dayton, a resident of the Town of Momence County of Kankakee and State of Ills. and has so resided for the past 40 years, aged 49 years, a person of lawful age, who, being duly sworn, declares in relation to the aforesaid claim, as follows:

That he was well acquainted with said Mattocks for ten years prior to 1862, when said Mattocks enlisted. Used to live near neighbor to him Mattocks, and frequently work with said Mattocks, at farm work. Saw him on an average as often as once a week, and knows of his own personal knowledge that before enlistment said Mattocks was a stout healthy youn man and could do a good fair days work at any kind of farm labor. Affiant further states that he saw said Mattocks immediately after he was discharged from the Military service in the fall or latter part of the summer of 1863. That at that time said soldier was suffering from Chronic diarrhea. was very much reduced, and was unable to do any work or even leave his room or bed, owing as affiant believes from the effects of said disease. That affiant has been intimately acquanited with said soldier ever since his dis charge and has seen him as often as once a week ever since date discharge, has waited upon said Mattocks when he had bad spells of his diarrhea, has employed said soldier to work for affiant and affiant states that said soldier since the date of his discharge has not been able to do no more than one half of and ordinary mans labor owing to his disability of diarrhea. That when he would attempt to work his diarrhea would come on and he would be confined to the house and bed for long spaces of time and during some of these periods affiant has taken care of said Mattocks and knows he was suffering from diarrhea. That during these periods said soldier was wholly unable to perform any manual labor whatever, but had to be waited upon constantly.

 

Pension Building, Washington, D.C.

Pension Building, Washington, D.C.

On 18 October 1883, the commissioner of the Pension Board wrote to Charles Hess, asking whether he had “personal knowledge that claimant received a gun shot wound of left leg while in the line of duty at the battle of Arkansas Post, Ark.”

Several days later, Hess wrote back:

In regard to the wounding of Cyrus R. Mattocks. I will say, I was at the Battle of Arkansas Post. Mattocks was also there, and was reported wounded in the left leg. I did not see him wounded, but always supposed he was wounded. right away after the Battle he was sent to the Hospital on account of his wound and it was generally reported he was wounded and I think during the summer of 1863 he was discharged, whether on a/c of said wound or not I am not able to say. I did not see him wounded, but always supposed such was the fact. This is all I know about the matter.

Was Charles Hess being completely honest in the above statement or was he instead trying to carefully distance himself from Rumsey’s claim that he had been wounded at Arkansas Post?

Another application for a Civil War pension was made on 29 January 1886 at Benton County, Indiana, and was filed 15 February 1886.  At this time, Rumsey was living at Earl Park in Benton County.  He was very probably living with his son Walter at the time, as Walter was one of the witnesses to his father’s application.  Rumsey listed the following reasons for requesting a pension:

During the Tallahatchie Campaign under Genl. Sherman from the exposure and the hardships he contracted Chronic Diarrhoea which yet greatly disables him.

Also at Arkansas Post, Ark, in or about Jan. 11, 1863, during an engagement he received a gun shot wound in [blank] leg.

The Diarrhoea has now resulted in Disease of Lungs & Liver.

The application included the affidavit of J.H. Sherwood and Harvey Force:

Also personally appeared J.H. Sherwood P. O. Fowler County of Benton State of Indiana and Harvy Force P. O. Fowler County of Benton and State of Indiana persons whom I certify to be respectable and entitled to credit, and who, being by me duly sworn, say that they were present and saw Sirus R. Mattocks the claimant, sign his name (make his mark) to the foregoing declaration and power of attorney; and they further swear that they have every reason to believe, from the appearance of said claimant and their acquaintance with him, that he is the identical person he represents himself to be; and that they have known him for 26 years last past; that his habits have been uniformly good, and his occupation has been that of a farmer and that they have no interest in the prosecution of this claim.

A medical examination was made of Rumsey (who was living at Earl Park) on 14 April 1886, apparently at Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana.  The following data was recorded:

Pulse rate per minute, 96; respiration, 28; temperature 98½; height, 6 feet ____ inches; weight, 140½ pounds; age 57 years.

Rumsey claimed he was suffering from numerous afflictions:

The left leg is painful & weak. Cannot walk a plough for the pain. Has diarrhea about one half the time, discharges light & thin. Has shortness of breath & palpitation of the heart, has a cough Expectorates [matter?] & blood at times. Has pain in right side in region of liver

The examiner’s found the following conditions:

Thin not anemic. Tongue liver & spleen normal, stomach tender. Lungs normal, Hearts action labored area[?] increased epigastric pulsation, impuls[?] near median line Abdomen dull walls normal. Sphincter ani relaxed, two intestinal piles congested & tender on each lateral wall large as filberts each mucous membrane congested & deeply ulcerated on anterior wall. Skin & conjunctiva normal On left leg 1 inch below insertion of ligamentium patella is a cicatrix 3/4 inch in diameter. There is a callus beneath cicatrix larg as one half a hickory nut—tender, the left leg around wound is ½ inch larger than right one. Disability equal to an anchylosis of wrist or ankle. Motion of left knee impaired

He is, in our opinion, entitled to a 1/4 rating for the disability caused by G S wd left leg, 1/2 for that caused by Chr Diarrhea & piles, and 1/4 caused by Dis of Heart

On 11 June 1886, in an attempt to help Rumsey get approval for his Civil War pension application, several acquaintances made affidavits on his behalf.  His friend Charles Hess made another declaration:

STATE OF Illinois
COUNTY OF Kankakee SS:

In the claim of Cyrus R Mattocks personally appeared before me, a Notary Public in and for the County and State aforesaid, Charles Hess a resident of Momence P.O., in the County of Kankakee and State of Illinois, who, being duly sworn according to law, on oath declares as follows: That he was late a member of Company “K” 113th Re’gt Illinois Vol’s and ranked as a member of said organization, and who, while in the service and line of duty as a soldier, at or near a place called the Tallahatchie Expedition States of Tennessee & Mississippi on or about the _______ day of Nov or Dec 1862. said Mattocks was taken sick with Camp Diarrhoea which continued to afflict said Mattocks until it became Chronic. That said affiant recollects very well that said Mattocks had said Diarrhoea on board of the Steamer[?], while guarding prisoners, enroute from Arkansas Post to Springfield Illinois, that when the boat arrived at St Louis Mo said Mattocks was taken off of the boat, and it was reported he was taken to Hospital. That said Mattocks never to affiants recollection joined said Co or Regiment again.  Affiant further states, that he was acquainted with said Mattocks before said Claimant Enlisted, lived near neighbor to Mattocks, and knows that Claimant always went by the name of “Rumsey” Mattocks, but that said Claimants full name is Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks and he further says that his knowledge of the above facts is obtained from the following sources, viz: being a member of said Co “K” and present with said Co at the time said disease was contracted and that he has no interest nor concern in this matter. that his age is 41 years.

Amos Merrill made the following affidavit:

STATE OF Illinois
COUNTY OF Kankakee SS:

In the claim of Cyrus R Mattocks personally appeared before me, a Notary Public in and for the County and State aforesaid, Amos A Merrill, aged 49 Years a resident of Momence P.O., in the County of Kankakee and State of Illinois, who, being duly sworn according to law, on oath declares as follows: That he was late a member of Company “K” 113th Re’gt Illinois Vol’s and ranked as a member of said organization, and who, while in the service and line of duty as a soldier, at or near a place called Memphis Tennessee State of ____________ on or about the __________ day of _________ 18___. and on the trip down the Mississippi River on the Vicksburgh Expedition and at Arkansas Post Ark. said Mattocks had the Diarrhoea. That affiant joined said Regiment (having previously enlisted August 11 1862) at Memphis about Dec 24th 1862 just as the Regiment was embarking to go down the River. That at the time affiant rejoined said Regiment said Mattocks had said Diarrhoea and continued to have said disease until he was taken off of the boat near St Louis, Mo. to be placed, as it was reported, in a Hospital, that said Mattocks, never to affiants Knowledge joined said Regiment again after going to Hospital. Affiant further states that he was acquainted with said Mattocks before said soldier Enlisted, that he went by the name of Rumsey, and that he is the identical person who now goes by the name of Cyrus R Mattocks and he further says that his knowledge of the above facts is obtained from the following sources, viz: that he was present with the Regiment when said soldier was sick with said disease and that he has no interest nor concern in this matter. that his age is 41 years.

Cyrus B. Scott and Caleb J. Wells made a joint declaration:

STATE OF Illinois
COUNTY OF Kankakee ss:

Personally appeared Cyrus B. Scott, aged 37 years and Caleb J. Wells, aged 57 years, Wells, of Wem P. O., County of Kankakee State of Illinois, and Scott of Lake Village P.O. Newton Co State of Indiana who, being duly sworn upon their oaths declare_ as follows: Affiant Scott says that he became acquainted with one Cyrus R. Mattocks, applicant for pension as private of Co “K” 113th Regt Ills No 238981, in the latter part of the summer of 1863, and affiant says that he has been acquainted with said Mattocks ever since. That at the time of his first acquaintance with said soldier, Mattocks looked to be in very poor health, hardly able to walk looked pale ematiated and sickly. At that time affiant did not learn the disease of which said Mattocks was suffering from. That affiant first met Mattocks near Lake Village Ind. This was soon after said Mattocks was discharged. That in about one month afterwards Mattocks came to affiant’s father’s home, and at that time Mattocks complained of having diarrhea, and affiant says that he has every reason to believe said Mattocks had said diarrhea. That affiant has been acquainted with Mattocks ever since. Mattocks has worked for affiant two years since to wit, from 1876 to 1878, during this period affiant had personal knowledge of the existence of said Diarrhea. Affiant Wells says that he has been acquainted with said Mattocks for 30 years. Knew him well before said soldier enlisted. Saw him in a week or two after his discharge from the service. Mattocks was in poor health at that time, not hardly able to get around, unable to do any work. Mattocks then complained of Chronic Diarrhea. That affiants Scott and Wells have both been personally acquainted with said Mattocks ever since his discharge lived neighbors to him off and on, a good part of this period near neighbors, and have seen him often, and know that he has Always had poor health since his discharge, always complained of Army disease (Chronic Diarrhea) and affiants both say that it is their opinion that said Mattocks since the date of his discharge has not been able to perform no more than one fourth of an ordinary able bodied mans labor, owing as affiants believe, to the existanse of his army disease. and they further say_ that their knowledge of the above facts is obtained from the following sources, viz: from personal knowledge, as they have been personally and intimately acquainted with said soldier, and that they have no interest or concern in this matter.

Rumsey himself made the following declaration on 11 June 1886:

State of Illinois }
Kankakee County } SS

Cyrus R. Mattocks, being duly sworn deposes and says that he is the identical person who enlisted in Co. “K” 113th Regt Ills Vols. on or about August 14th 1862, under the name of Rumsey Mattocks, and was honerably discharged at the Hospital known as the “New House of Refuge” at St. Louis Missouri, on or about July 1863, on account of disability contracted while in the service of the U.S. as a soldier in said organization. That in his pension papers, his name by some means appears as Cyrus W. Mattocks, that he is not aware, or has he any means of knowing, how said mistake in his name occurred, that he is an applicant for invalid pension on account of wound in left leg just below the Knee, and Chronic Diarrhoea, that as his wound is slight and he is unable to prove its origin in the service, he hereby withdraws his claim for pension on that account, that he is unable to procure the testimony of a commissioned officer of his Company, or of his orderly Sergeant, as to the time – place and circumstances of his contracting Chronic Diarrhoea while in the service aforesaid, owing to the fact that said officers say that it has been so long that they cannot recollect, he therefore prays that the affidavit of Comrads may be received and considered in lieu of the testimony of said officers, affiant further says that he went to Hospital “New House of Refuge” at St. Louis, Mo. on or about the last of January or poss. of February 1863, and remained in said Hospital until he was discharged, that he was placed in Hospital on account of Chronic Diarrhoea and discharged on account of said disease.

Cyrus R. Mattocks

On 15 July 1886, Rumsey, now living at Lake Village, Newton County, Indiana, filed an affidavit, in response to a concern expressed by those adjudicating his pension application:

STATE OF Illinois
COUNTY OF Kankakee ss:

Personally appeared Cyrus R. Mattocks and ________ of Lake Village P. O., County of Newton State of Indiana who, being duly sworn upon his oath declares as follows: That he is an applicant for pension as a private of Co. “K” 113th Regt Ills Vols. on account of Chronic Diarrhaea Contracted while in the Army. That to some of the proofs which he has filed in support, affiant has signed his name and to others he has made his mark and Clamiant hereby expleanies said discrepancy as follows, first that it is with great dificulty that affiant can write his name at at any time, but owing to the shattered condition of his nerves it is entirely impossible for him to write at all during a portion of the time, and therefore at such times he is obliged to sign by mark, that he always signs his name if possible, further affiant saith not.

The explanation was accepted and Rumsey’s application was finally allowed.  However, he was only granted a pension for his chronic diarrhea and resulting disease of the rectum.  It was decided that there was insufficient evidence of the origin of the gunshot wound, and Rumsey had withdrawn his prosecution of this particular claim in his affidavit of 11 June 1886.  The disease of the liver and lungs was disallowed under “Order 92”.  Rumsey was pensioned from 15 February 1886 at the rate of $4 per month.

In March 1890, Rumsey contracted “La Grippe” and pneumonia.  While living at Wem in Momence Township, Rumsey began to seek an increase in his pension payment:

State of Illinois, County of Kankakaee ss.

On this 8th day of June A.D. one thousand eight hundred and eighty ninety one personally appeared before me, a Notary Public within and for the County and State aforesaid Cyrus R. Mattocks aged 62 years, a resident of Wem County of Kankakee State of Illinois who, being duly sworn according to law, declares that he is a pensioner of the United States, enrolled at the Indianopolis Ind Pension Agency at the rate of Four dollars per month, Certificate No. 336547 by reason of disability from Chronic Diarhea and resulting disease of rectum incurred in the Military service of the United States, while serving as a Private Co. K 113th Regiment Illinois Volunteers

That he believes himself entitled to an increase of pension on account of an increased degree of disability, since last examination, from above named cause and results. As to the results of above, he declares he is not a medical man, and is unable to be specific and requests a Special Medical Examination for such, and that he be allowed an additional rating for any and all disabilities that may appear at the time of said examination, if the same can reasonably be accepted by the Medical Referee of the Pension Office, as a result or sequence of the disability for which he is now pensioned. Notwithstanding said results or sequences are not specified herein, because his inability to do so. He requests a careful review of his case and all errors of rating found to exist be corrected by a re-issue from the beginning according to law.

On 23 September 1891, Rumsey, a resident of Wem, was examined by a medical board of examiners at Kankakee, Kankakee County, Illinois.  At the time Rumsey was seeking an increase for chronic diarrhea, “resuilting disease of rectum, liver and lungs,” and a gun shot wound to the left leg.  The board made the following findings:

Pulse rate, 80; respiration, 21; temperature, nor.; height, 6 feet X inches; weight, 133~ pounds; age, 63 years. Is poorly nourished and body somewhat emaciated and the muscles soft and flabby. Is considerably debilitated. Tongue coated heavily and the breath very fetid. Digestive organs in bad condition. Liver is torpid but not enlarged or tender over liver. Is very tender over region of stomach and is tympanitic and tender over whole of abdomen. Is aphysic[?] aphonic since last March when he had the “La Grippe” complicated with pneumonia. Is now in an advanced stage of tuberculosis of the lungs, the capios[?] of both being flattened and percussion dull and the respiratory murmur very feeble. Coughs a great deal and expectorates very freely[?], a matter muco-purulent in character. Measurmence[?] of chest at rest 33 in at full suspiration 34 1/4 in & full expiration 32 1/8 in Heart sound & healthy and in normal position.

Allege to have an attack of diarrhoea as often as every 2 months lasting six to ten days. he is surely very much emaciated and debilitated from the effects of diarrhoea and the lung affection. He is not troubled with sore throat but there is paralysis of vocal chords causing aphonia. No piles or disease of the rectum or anus in any way. Kidney & urinary organs healthy. Evidence of a g.s.w. on anterior surface of leg 4 inches below knee. Scar 3/4 in long by 1/4 in wide. Is not tender thickened nor adherent. Does not disable knee in the least. All other organs healthy.

He is, in our opinion, entitled to a 6/18 rating for the disability caused by Chr. diarrhoea, for that caused by __________, and 12/18 for that caused by tuberculosis of lungs & larynx & loss of voice

Commencing 23 September 1891, Rumsey, of Wem, was approved for an increase in his pension to $6 per month.

Amy Tanner, daughter of Rumsey’s son William Mattocks, wrote that Rumsey, “[i]n his late years … lived with his sons, his last year with our parents” in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.

Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks died 5 March 1892, aged 64, at the home of his son William at 6334 South Halsted Street in Chicago.  He was buried at Shrontz Cemetery in Momence Township, Kankakee County.  According to Amy Tanner, Rumsey’s grave was located by some evergreen trees in the southwest corner of the cemetery, near the graves of his parents.

Children of Cyrus Rumsey and Hester Ann (Hess) Mattocks:

+    16.1.  Walter Andrew [8], born 25 August 1858.
+    16.2.  Very doubtfully, I think, Rumsey.
+    16.3.  Possibly Catherine, born about 1863.
+    16.4.  William Eugene, born 17 August 1863.

Child of Cyrus Rumsey and Wealthie Priscilla (Perry) Mattocks:

+    16.5.  Abigail “Abbie” Lorraine, born 27 February 1873.

Child of Lucien and Hester Ann (Hess) Jones:

+    17.a.  Cora Ellen, born about 1873.

Sources

  • 1840 United States Census, Genesee County, New York, page 160 (M704-285/86/87).
  • 1850 United States Census, Iroquois County, Illinois, pages 143, 145 (M432-110).
  • 1860 United States Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, pages 119, 130 (M653-192).
  • 1870 United States Census, Jasper County, Indiana, page 576 (M593-326).
  • 1870 United States Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, pages 10, 56-57, 178 (M593-238).
  • 1870 United States Census, Newton County, Indiana, page 73 (M593-347).
  • 1880 United States Census, Iroquois County, Illinois, page 254 (T9-0214).
  • 1880 United States Census, Jefferson County, Kansas, pages 143, 144 (T9-0383).
  • 1880 United States Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, page 169 (T9-0219).
  • 1880 United States Census, Newton County, Indiana, pages 257-58 (T9-301).
  • 1900 United States Census, DeWitt County, Illinois, page 136 (T623-297).
  • 1900 United States Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, page 9 (T623-312).
  • 1910 United States Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, page 9 (T624-298).
  • 1910 United States Census, Porter County, Indiana, page 155 (T624-374).
  • 1920 United States Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, pages 3, 74 (T625-377).
  • 1930 United States Census, Kankakee County, Illinois, page 8 (T626-526).
  • —, Civil War Pension File for Cyrus Rumsey Mattocks, No. 336547.
  • —, “Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900,” at http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/cgi-bin/archives/marriage.s.
  • —, “Kankakee Valley Genealogical Society: Master Cemetery Index,” at http://www.kvgs.org/cemeterylist/content9201.html, created 13 March 2000.
  • —, Momence Township, Kankakee County, Illinois, land ownership map, 1883. [IMAGE]
  • —, “[Theakiki, Volume 16, Number 4],” at http://www.kvgs.org/theakiki/tkkv16n4.pdf, PDF version of Theakii 16[November 1986], accessed 25 February 2007.
  • —, “[Theakiki, Volume 17, Number 1],” at http://www.kvgs.org/theakiki/tkkv17n1.pdf, PDF version of Theakii 17[February 1987], accessed 25 February 2007.
  • —, “[Theakiki, Volume 19, Number 4],” at http://www.kvgs.org/theakiki/tkkv19n4.pdf, PDF version of Theakii 19[November 1989], accessed 25 February 2007.
  • —, History of Wyoming County, N.Y. (New York: F.W. Beers and Company, 1880), page 277.
  • —, Mattocks Memorial Package, a genealogical report prepared for Carl Kenneth Mattocks by an unidentified genealogist (circa 1989), (some pages contain the heading “Birchwood – Simsbury Printery”).
  • —, Wealthy P. Mattocks gravestone, Leggtown Cemetery, Sun River Terrace, Kankakee County, Illinois. [IMAGE]
  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, “Family Search Internet Genealogy Service,” at http://www.familysearch.org, submitted, at least in part, by Mary Fran Downey, accessed 22 February 2000.
  • David A. and Janice Hess, “Shrontz Cemetery, Momence Twp., Kankakee Co., IL.,” at http://searches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/data/il+index+301628932502+F, created January 2000.
  • Ronald Vern Jackson, editor, New York 1830 Census Index (North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems, 1990), page 436.
  • D.G. Jones, “Descendants of Captain David Perry (1741-1826),” The Captain David Perry Web Site (1999), at http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~dagjones/docs/, accessed 10 May 2004.
  • [Leona A. Mathis], “Wealthy P. Mattocks ( – 1873) – Find A Grave Memorial,” at http://www.findagrave.com/, created 4 June 2003.
  • Carl Kenneth Mattocks, genealogical information from the research of Carl Kenneth Mattocks.
  • Carl Kenneth Mattocks to Gregg Leon Mattocks, letter, 20 May 1999.
  • Mike Sweeney, “[Jefferson County, KS 1883 List of Pensioners on the Roll],” at http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/jefferson/military/1883.txt, accessed 30 May 2009. [LINK]
  • Amy Tanner, family history, undated. [LINK]
  • Amy Tanner to Louise Schmidt, letter, 1 May 1979. [LINK]
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